From the Greek Anthology

 

 

The following are faux-fragments of Greek texts by Christopher Bakken.  Do note that, modeled after actual ancient Greek texts, these new fragments retain much of the originals’ worldliness and directness about matters bodily and sexual–they may not be suitable for all readers.

 

From the Greek Anthology

 

 

*

 

 

Among the things I’ve dreamt about the most:

the stinky ladies of Limnos

 

 

*

 

 

Dawn  [                                              ]

             skid-marks

on                                   my chiton

 

 

*

 

 

Blessed one

of the blonde braids

 

why did you leave

 

[                           ] my fingers

smelling of goat?

 

 

*

 

 

Here lies Philodemos, famous on Crete

for the smoothness of his dildos

 

 

*

 

 

  ]please [

] Cypriot [

   ] wet [

 [-dream [

 

 

*

 

 

After visiting the exquisite bath-house

Agrippa built on behalf of the middle class

even Hera wipes her ass

 

 

*

 

 

To thee, Bacchus, Philias the debauched

dedicates this coffee mug

                                   of dark wine from Halkidiki

 

hoping you’ll return it full of single malt

 

 

*

 

 

[            ] The Samian whore Nika

fed me over-ripe figs [                       ]

and lentils dressed in fish sauce

 

[                                                          ]

 

so I treated her

to a bit of my butt music

 

 

*

 

 

Sweet mother, it was

 

                              the men in the agora

made me  [                         ] fuck Strato’s sheep

 

 

*

 

 

Only an asshole would try to describe

the sweetness of Dimitra’s farts

 

 

*

 

 

                                          Feast day of Asklepius

 

On every corner, quinces are impaled

upon the boners of Hermes

One response

19 02 2009
New Ancient Ironic Poems « Structure & Surprise

[…] New Ancient Ironic Poems 19 02 2009 Christopher Bakken, the writer of Structure & Surprise’s “The Ironic Structure,” has written a collection of faux-fragments from invented Greek texts which often employ the ironic turn.  Check them out here. […]

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